Mexico on verge of legalizing medical cannabis

The Mexican Congress passed a bill to legalize the scientific and medical use of marijuana. When the president Enrique Peña Nieto signs it, the proposal will become a federal law

 

The war on drugs has been a failure around the world. It has only caused more pain, violence, death and benefits for drug traffickers and corrupt politicians. And in Mexico they know very well the consequences. In the last 10 years, it is estimated that more than 180,000 people have died or disappeared in the battle against organized crime in Mexico alone.

So after the repression, it seems it’s time for policies and legislations to regulate rather than penalize. The first step has just been given by the Congress of Mexico, with which a large majority (301 votes in favor, 88 against and two abstentions) has approved the medical use and scientific research involving marijuana.

And when President Enrique Peña Nieto signs it, the bill will definitely become a federal law. A simple signature is what separates the therapeutic and medical use of marijuana from current illegality.

With the reforms, THC is established as a psychotropic substance with therapeutic value. The approved bill details that it has been shown that the therapeutic use of cannabis can help treat 40 different diseases, such as cancer, AIDS, glaucoma, sclerosis or epilepsy.

The legislative decision in Mexico is far from the ultimate goal of advocates of total decriminalization of cannabis. But they consider it a battle won. It is a further step forward to take control of the plant from organized crime and return it to the people.

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